Relationship between minimal art and Zen philosophy

By 1605 Collective
Art, Inspiration

The advent of minimalism in the middle of the 20th century revolutionised design, architecture, and music. Extreme simplicity and sparingness are characteristics of minimalism as a design philosophy. It was initially influenced by Japanese architecture, which included elements of Zen Buddhism into its design. By unveiling the Ma that is hidden inside things and materials, Japanese Zen Buddhism attempts to understand reality. Ma, which loosely translates as "gap," "space," "stop," or "the space between two structural pieces," encapsulates the importance of eschewing the pointless and clinging to life's little pleasures. The movement as a whole is founded on the idea that removing the superfluous can reveal an object's core.

The rebellion against all establishment institutions marked the 1960s. The contemporary art scene was no different, and the young artists of the day developed a brand-new aesthetic with minimalism as its foundation. A new aesthetic appeal was developed by artists that benefited from the height, weight, and light content of an artwork. Additionally, these artists abandoned the concepts of fine art held by earlier generations in favor of an industrial aesthetic that used prefabricated materials to give new meaning to forms with a foundation in daily life. It was a movement that aimed to capture an everyday object's essence by utilising it rather than enhancing it.

Since then, the emphasis on simplicity as a moral ideal has permeated society and can be seen as a lifestyle. We are currently experiencing a revolution in how people live, 150 years after the last one. The global movement known as minimalism aims to stop the spread of consumerism and redirect our attention away from material possessions.

 

Toko Shinoda  sign of spring
Toko Shinoda - Sign of Spring

  

paul cupido
Paul Cupido - Matsushima Day 2, 2019

 

Margaret Lansink
Margaret Lansink

 

 

Albarran Cabrera
Albarran Cabrera